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  • John Kim

Matthew 7:9 “Which of you, if your son asks for bread, will give him a stone? Or if he asks for a fish, will give him a snake? If you, then, though you are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father in heaven give good gifts to those who ask him!”

Elaine and I are taking an online leadership class offered by Danny Silk at Bethel Church. The other day I went through the module on dreams, which impacted me greatly. My key takeaways…

1. Dreaming affirms our identity: We are created in the image of the greatest dreamer, God himself. It is actually in our nature to dream.

2. Dreaming is our responsibility: In Matthew 7, Jesus tells us that we must ask, seek and knock. If we believe in a good father, we must dream big.

3. Dreaming furthers our security: Proverbs says that when hope is deferred your heart becomes sick. Dreaming is actually good for us.

Pastor Danny encouraged us to write down 100 dreams to activate what God has in store. I’m going to start on that today.

God, you’re so amazing to dream up the universe. I pray that I will come more into line with your heart as a dreamer because it’s what you desire for me. I love it when my son dreams big, and how much more so is that true of you when I commit the desires of my heart at your feet. Thank you for speaking, and please help me to be bold in writing out these 100 dreams in the days ahead. In your son’s name, Amen.

  • John Kim

James 4:14 "Yet you do not know what your life will be like tomorrow. You are just a vapor that appears for a little while and then vanishes away."

In the last 2 days I’ve had 2 close friends whose fathers passed away somewhat unexpectedly. They both lived full lives, and were very much loved by those around them. But it’s reminder that life is short, and we should really be living for eternity. In Crazy Love, Francis Chan recounts a story of Stan Gerlach, a successful businessman, who was well known in the community. “Stan was giving a eulogy at a memorial service when he decided to share the gospel. At the end of his message, Stan told the mourners, ‘You never know when God is going to take your life. At that moment, there’s nothing you can do about it. Are you ready?’ Then Stan sat down, fell over, and died. His wife and sons tried to resuscitate him, but there was nothing they could do—just as Stan had said a few minutes earlier. I’ll never forget receiving that phone call and heading over to the Gerlach house. Stan’s wife, Suzy, was just arriving home. She hugged me and cried. One of her sons, John, stepped out of the car weeping. He asked me, ‘Did you hear the story? Did you hear? I’m so proud of him. My dad died doing what he loved doing most. He was telling people about Jesus.’ I was asked to share a word with everyone gathered. There were children, grandchildren, neighbors, and friends. I opened my Bible to Matthew 10:32–33: ‘Whoever acknowledges me before men, I will also acknowledge him before my Father in heaven. But whoever disowns me before men, I will disown him before my Father in heaven.’ I asked everyone to imagine what it must have felt like for Stan. One moment, he was at a memorial service saying to a crowd, ‘This is who Jesus is!’ The next, he was before God hearing Jesus say, ‘This is who Stan Gerlach is!’ One second he was confessing Jesus; a second later, Jesus was confessing him! It happens that quickly. And it could happen to any of us. In the words of Stan Gerlach, ‘Are you ready?’" Chan, Francis. Crazy Love: Overwhelmed by a Relentless God (pp. 48-49).

  • John Kim

Galatians 2:20 “I have been crucified with Christ and I no longer live, but Christ lives in me.”

Last night I was on a YPO webinar with esteemed Wharton Professor, Adam Grant. He had a few lessons for us on leadership in crisis, and the first centered around psychological safety. “I was involved in some research at Google a few years back, and we found that the best teams weren’t the best because they had the best members. They were the best because their culture allowed for members to speak up with their views. They had safe environments.” Of course, if no consensus is formed, members must eventually disagree and commit to a plan of action, but the process of hashing out these ideas invariably leads to better outcomes. And how does one create an atmosphere of psychological safety? It starts from the top. “Yesterday I had a conversation with Melinda Gates about how they try to create this environment at the Gates Foundation. She mentioned that they keep a record of minor guffaws they committed, and distribute them within the organization. When people hear ‘I was with this head of state yesterday and I called him by the wrong name’ or some such fault, it makes us more approachable to our teams and forms psychological safety.” In meditating on God’s will for me regarding psychological safety, I felt led to Galatians 2:20 that states that I no longer live, but Christ lives in me. The more I align myself with that reality, the more I find myself comfortable with sharing my own weaknesses and navigating through ups and downs. What do I have to prove, if it’s no longer my life? God thank you for your word. You are repeatedly revealing research to confirm the truth that you already demonstrated thousands of years ago. If Melinda Gates can drive transformation by showing her vulnerability through minor guffaws, how much more can you drive transformation through the vulnerability of Christ’s death on the cross? I declare it again today, it is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. I have nothing to prove, because you’ve proven it all. Please align me more deeply to this truth today. In your son’s name, Amen. * YPO usually restricts content but I have received permission to share lessons from this webinar. My quotes from Adam Grant are paraphrased.